Learn and Earn Over Lunch Series


Learn and Earn Over Lunch Winter 2021.

Please join us in 2021 as we keep our monthly noon hour Learn and Earn Over Lunch Series rolling with a new 2021 line up of topics and instructors. 

  • Getting to the Heart of the Problem: Using Behavioral ChainAnalysis to Understand Simple and Complex Behavioral Problems, Mandy Porter, PsyD, ABPP
  • DBT for Teens: What’s in the Soup?  Erica Tan, PsyD
  • Improving the Standard of Care for Teens with Anorexia Nervosa, Charlotte Thomas, LCSW
  • Treating Complex Suicidal Teens Across Levels of Care, Andrew White, PhD, ABPP

Wednesday, January 20th, 2021 | Getting to the Heart of the Problem: Using Behavioral Chain Analysis to Understand Simple and Complex Behavioral Problems

Figuring out how best to solve a problem requires an accurate and complete understanding of the problem. Part detective and part puzzle master, the clinician’s job is to figure out the plot line and exactly how the pieces fit together in order to gain a clear understanding of what the problem behavior is and how it gets maintained over time. Because of the severity, complexity, and at times life-threatening behaviors which many people who seek Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) have, DBT utilizes a specific form of behavioral assessment known as a behavioral chain analysis (BCA) to sort what’s going on and develop a rock-solid, person-centered and problem-specific case formulation.

Dr. Porter will provide an overview for when and how BCA is used, its components, and clinical tricks for orienting your client to its use and getting them on board. Like all talks in the L(earn)/ Lunch Series, Dr. Porter will bring the content together with clinical vignettes.

Learning Objectives | By the conclusion of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. List the key components of a BCA
  2. Describe instances of when to use a BCA
  3. Describe how to orient a client to the BCA

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Instructor | Mandy Porter, PsyD, ABPP is a clinical psychologist certified as a DBT Clinician by the DBT-Linehan Board of Certification; she is also the manager of Portland DBT Institute of Salem. Prior to beginning at PDBTI, Dr. Porter completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Oregon State Hospital where she provided full fidelity DBT. Her clinical interests include: evidence-based therapies for mood disorders, personality disorders, and severe and persistent mental illness.
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Wednesday, February 10th, 2021 | DBT for Teens: What’s in the Soup?

One of the oldest adaptations of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), DBT for Adolescents (DBT-A) is an efficacious treatment for adolescents who engage in suicidal and self-harming behaviors as well as other serious and complex behaviors. DBT-A includes a number of important structural and stylistic modifications to make it relevant for teens, including multi-family group and special considerations regarding reporting potentially life-threatening behaviors to parents.

Dr. Tan will provide a high-level overview of the adaptations made for teens who struggle with complex, severe problems rooted in emotion dysregulation. She will overview differences in the treatment modes for DBT-A as compared to standard DBT, and will describe recent innovations that PDBTI and DBT-A treatment developer Alec Miller, PsyD are using which target executive functioning, building structure, and improving health and wellness.

Learning Objectives | By the conclusion of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. List the main adaptations of DBT-A
  2. Describe the data to date supporting DBT-A
  3. Describe two experimental adaptations in DBT-A

Instructor | Erica Tan, PsyD is an adolescent psychologist certified as a DBT Clinician by the DBT-Linehan Board of Certification and is a member of the PDBTI Teen and Family Team. She also specializes in work with LGBTQ+ individuals and their families. Dr. Tan is a frequently requested senior member of PDBTI’s DBT faculty, providing training, supervision, and consultation in DBT throughout the United States. Dr. Tan has been practicing DBT for over a decade.
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Wednesday, March 10th, 2021 | Improving the Standard of Care for Teens with Anorexia Nervosa

With over two decades of research supporting its efficacy, Family-Based Treatment of Eating Disorders in Adolescents (FBT) has been widely accepted as the primary evidence-based treatment for Anorexia Nervosa (AN) in teens. However, many of those who receive FBT (as many as 50% in some studies) continue to experience eating disordered behaviors. Additionally, the evidence for FBT for bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder is mixed. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) has been identified as a possible adjunct or recommended treatment for youth with AN who do not respond to FBT. We will provide an overview of FBT and will discuss clinical indicators for deciding which treatment is best suited for treating a particular adolescent with an eating disorder (ED). We will also overview how DBT conceptualizes and treats EDs in the adolescent population.

Learning Objectives | By the conclusion of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. List three features of Family-Based Treatment of Eating Disorders
  2. Describe two criteria when DBT is preferred to FBT in the treatment of adolescent EDs

Instructor | Charlotte Thomas, LCSW is an ED/DBT expert with specialization in treating complex, difficult to treat individuals with eating disorders and associated issues including borderline personality disorder, depression and anxiety. She has provided services to individuals, teens, adults, families, and groups. Charlotte is the Program Manager for PDBTI’s Pathways to Mindful Eating (PME) program that includes DBT outpatient and intensive outpatient services. In addition, Charlotte trains clinics and individuals nationally on DBT, program development, eating disorders, and evidence-based practices.
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Wednesday, April 14th, 2021 | Treating Complex Suicidal Teens Across Levels of Care

Suicidal behavior remains a major public health challenge in the United States and remains the second leading cause of death among high school teens 14 to 18 years old after unintentional injuries. Between 2009 and 2018, suicide rates for those 14 to 18 years old increased by 61.7%, from 6.0 to 9.7 per 100,000. In addition to those that complete suicide, there are many more who make a suicide attempts or struggle with suicidal ideation. For example, approximately 95,000 high school-aged youth visited emergency departments for self-injury in 2018. A number of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for suicidal teens exist, including DBT, and span levels of care as well as cultural backgrounds.

Dr. White will overview the prevalence of the problem and evidence-based suicide prevention interventions for teens. He will then describe clinical considerations to contemplate with respect to determining the appropriate level of care for a specific suicidal teen. He will weave clinical illustrations throughout his talk.

Learning Objectives | By the conclusion of this event, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the scope of the problem of suicide and suicidal behaviors among teens
  2. List three suicide prevention EBPs for teens.
  3. Describe clinical considerations when determining the appropriate level of care for a suicidal teen

Instructor | Andrew White, PhD, ABPP is Associate Director of PDBTI, a clinical psychologist, and certified by the DBT-Linehan Board of Certification as a DBT clinician. Dr. White previously directed the PDBTI Teen and Family program. Dr. White is also a member of the PDBTI training team. In his role as Associate Director, Dr. White oversees the day-to-day clinical operations of Portland DBT Institute and its sister organization, Heal, Thrive, Grow Behavioral Health. His clinical areas of expertise include suicide, clinical risk management, adolescent and family treatment, dialectical behavior therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, behavioral therapy, and implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP). He has extensive research and evaluation experience on both coasts, with specific interests in community-based program evaluation, multilevel modeling, frequent use of psychiatric emergency services, and general evaluation of EBPs.
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CONTINUING EDUCATION HOURS

Portland DBT Institute has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6326.
Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Portland DBT Institute is solely is responsible for all aspects of the programs.


Questions about the Learn and Earn Series?
Please contact our Community Relations Liaison,
Brianna Johnson, at (503) 290-3297 or bjohnson@pdbti.org.